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. greece unveiling that $10 billion eurobond buyback. a 52-week high in france and germany. our road map this morning begins in washington where fiscal cliff negotiations according to the "times" has "collapsed." at least for now. with less than a month until the deadline, who blinks first if anyone? >> goldman takes dell from a strength to a buy. is it time to look at the stock and maybe even other players in the beat up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing data out of china. not bad. 50.6. that's the highest in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on
that didn't have. greece does not have an exit. citigroup had a 90% chance earlier this year. the biggest day of this jurn year was june 17th when they elected a moderate who did not try to pull greece out. and germany stepped up and gave them some money and that september the 6th, that was the european central bank. so you had china, maria, the united states and greece. none of them went off the cliff. maria, this is for you. our little christmas present for you, maria. >> thank you. thank you. >> we want to remember, by the way, this is emblem attic of all these nice things you have said this week for the victims of the newtown connecticut tragedy. we love the way you all have been strong in support of them. >> thank you. i very much appreciate that. michael, let me ask you, what do you want to be avoiding in 2013? >> i think you have to look at it from the standpoint of extreme. it's clearly in the bond market. it's clearly in the love for dividends. it's clearly in the love for income versus capital appreciation, versus cycle kral. i call this the rocky balboa stock market. we've had
now owe more per person than they do in greece. by some measurements, we're worse off than greece now. this deal will do nothing to help reduce the deficit. >> senator paul, happy new year to you, to everyone out there. thanks very much for joining us. >> thank you, wolf. >> please pass along my best regards to your dad as well. >>> we have more details emerging on the secretary of state hillary clinton's condition. we'll speak with dr. gupta on the blood clot that has just been discovered between her skull and her brain. excuse me, sir i'm gonna have to ask you to power down your little word game. i think your friends will understand. oh no, it's actually my geico app...see? ...i just uh paid my bill. did you really? from the plane? yeah, i can manage my policy, get roadside assistance, pretty much access geico 24/7. sounds a little too good to be true sir. i'll believe that when pigs fly. ok, did she seriously just say that? geico. just click away with our free mobile app. >>> we're following the breaking news about the secretary of state hillary clinton. diagnosed as having a blood
rather than contraction. it's been since october of last year. also abroad greece announcing it will buy back bonds through a dutch auction. the set up whether allow athenss to assess the level of demand before setting a final bryce for the deal. part of the country's efforts to cut its about a along debt. and in germany, merkel is not ruling out the possibility of notifying greece some of its debt once athens finances are in better shape. angela merkel told a german tabloid that the question of the so-called haircut can be revisited. in the past, merkel's government had ruled out forgiving any debt. >> in corporate new, ubs is reportedly close to a settlement. the "new york times" says the swiss bank is expected to pay horn $450 million over claims that some of its employees submitted false libor rates. that's pretty huge story and we will take a look and ten to see what happens with this. also morgan stanley trader is under investigation by cme regulators over trades and treasury futures four years ago. at the time he was employed by goldman sachs. he's now head of global interest rate
the stand outout here is the euro. greece getting a five notch upgrade at the s&p. our road map this morning starts with gm. government motors no more. the treasury to exit its stake in the next 12 to 18 months, purchasing 2 million shares by the end of this month. >> another challenging quarter for fedex with the blame squarely on sandy. but the stock is up pre-market. >> oracle posts a strong quarter with even stronger guidance. the season rebound in europe. no impact from the fiscal cliff. >> and ge gets boosted from ubs's key call list on the weaker than expected macro environment. still on the list is including -- well tell you in a couple of minutes. >> general motors is up sharply in the pre-market session. the treasury department says it intends to sell the rest of its stakes in gm in the next 12 to 15 months. the automaker will buy back 200 million shares from treasury for $27.50 a share. treasury says it plans to sell its other remaining shares through various means in an orderly fashion. timothy masssad will join us later. this could be a buy signal with the government signaling i
of trying euro trend. >> that's fine. >> misery loves company. we can have it all forever, like greece. >> we're not greece. and that's the whole point. neither is britain which is pretending its greece, and look where it's getting them. britain's not growing at all. >> would you do some stimulus? >> i probably would, yeah. >> what kind? >> there's a ton of infrastructure that needs to be done in this country. >> then do it. and borrow money -- >> it's free. we can borrow money for free for 30 years in real terms. the market is not telling the u.s. to tighten fiscal policy. it's telling the u.s. to borrow some money. >> can you make sure we only do things -- we're not going to fill high speed rail lines between cities no one wants to travel to? >> if you spend a billion dollars i can't guarantee that every last cent of it is going to be spent properly. >> how moan solyndras will be in that balance? >> only two. >> you have to deal with the issues that krugman never deals with. i love the explanation we should spend spend spend. what happens when interest rates rise? two is you're talki
they agreed to give greece now within days 34 billion euros. they've done a deal where the ecb will regulate the biggest banks in europe and, importantly, the germans will be exempted, state run banks, savings banks. so the skeletons can stay in the german closet there as far as the banks are concerned. that was important for the germans. it is ironic in a year when so many people called for a breakup the european union this summit, poland actually said we'd like to start off applications to become the 18th member of the eurozone. that will play out during the course of next year. as far as the stock markets are concerned, today is relatively flat overall. no follow through from china which i mentioned earlier. i thought it was very interesting. here you go. >> the european markets are closing now. >> some are red. some are green. if you check the data you'll see we haven't really moved at all today. china was up 4%. shanghai was up 4% overnight. normally you would expect the australian miners, global miners listed in london to bounce on that. they didn't very much today. and that is partly
rumors out of greece. >> you guys hopeful on the floor that we get a deal sometime soon? >> you may not get a finalized deal but you'll get something done before the year end which will give us confidence to keep the market stabilized. >> members of the house tomorrow go home tomorrow for christmas. can you get a deal if they are home? >> i think you can. i think it's a little more di
. >> did you see the s&p upgraded greece today by six notches? i had to hit the machine to make sure that was the correct number there. >> well, you know, a lot of volatility in rate. >> bob pisani, what do you think today? a pretty good real under way? all about the fiscal cliff? >> well, the markets, is bullish because the markets are acting like 2013 will resolve a lot of problems so we've multi-month highs in the stock market. we have the safe haven, gold and bonds just getting hit badly again. i mean, bond yields are moving up. gold is moving down on a day when the dollar is -- is weak today, so the markets are sort of acting like things are actually going to resolve themself. even now, maria, you might notice, the headlines out this afternoon aren't bullish. markets believe a deal is coming quickly. >> so do you guys. you don't have any necessarily different guidance or expectation or reports than we do, and you both are very much in step that a deal gets done what. if it doesn't? >> i kind of think what's going on right now is a little dance. everybody has to appeal to their c
maybe, the worst is finally past, there's some hideous headline out of greece or portugal or spain or italy that the comes back with a vengeance and the s&p gets bashed down by a torrent of selling. that's why it's so important to prepare yourself and your stocks for the next catastrophe around the corner. expected or unexpected, so that you can make money in any market, or at least lose less and not just when things are going smoothly. you have to build this stuff into what i call your world view. you have to assume that somewhere, sometime, something will go wrong. i'm not saying you should be a super skeptic perma-bear, not at all. over the course of my 31-plus years in this business i've seen the averages climb way too way, watched the market make people way too much money to ever be that cynical and close-minded. being negative all the time has not historically been a lucrative strategy, and i don't see any reason why that should change now. there are a handful of incredibly smart, professional short sellers, hats off, able to turn pessimism into profits but i don't recommend
it was dubai and bp oil spill or greece or spain or the deleveraging or foreclosures. any of these things that we're supposed to take us out and yet we keep moving. i think the fiscal cliff is another one of these. >> let me ask you about the timing then. deutsche bank had a note out yesterday where they suggested that central banks have bought us a six months of time on the markets. if pmis do not improve, will we see growth? what would you say to that view? >> i mean, i'm pretty simple on this. i do not believe and we could debate this probably all day that quantitative easing itself has helped the economy at all. banks put that money right back to the fed as excess reserves. it hasn't boosted money in the economy. i don't believe that we've seen a false rally or sugar high. i think the growth in the economy and growth in the markets has been driven by productivity and profits. i think it's real. it's slow. it's real. we're going to have a weak fourth quarter. i believe most of that weakness is because of sandy. we're going to pick up later in the quarter. we'll have 2.5% to 3% growth n
. that something has to be growth and i still don't see how europe has a plan for more growth. >> we know greece is done with because they've already restructured their debt and what they did in the last two weeks, which the germans said they should do, they should have done three years ago they'd be better off. spain is the immediate problem, you have 26% unemployment which is non-performing loans. >> we have to go, 2,200 pages of health care, i'm sure the notes spain's taken how greece has got money at every turn, their pile is a bigger pile than the health care plan. >> i could listen to you guys talk all day long. that was a great conversation. yra, rick, thanks so much. see you in a bit. >>> zynga stock popping. julia boorstin is live in l.a. with more. >> good morning to you, carl. this is the first of many steps before zynga can make money from online gambling. applying for a real money gaming license in nevada is a sign of zynga's seriousness creating new revenue streams. it sent it up as much as 9% higher today. the company warns it will take as much as a year and a half to get approval
farm in maine that helps turn greece into finding peace. >> i know when chris died, we kept thinking about how we were going to remember him. and we kept thinking that his spirit was moving through the trees every time you saw them moving. i seem to be drawn to maine even though i've never lived here. it's pretty amazing. >> we're in the wreath business and have been since 1971. columbia falls is a little town in coastal washington county. the perfect little country town kind of thing. we're looking for 12 to 18-inch pieces. as fast as this brush is coming in, we're using it on the other end. we're out on the land that produces the tips for national wreaths across america day. >> each wreath is made of balsam that is picked off of our own land. it began as a family tradition to donate 5,000 wreaths to arlington national cemetery. >> a great source of pride for my family. it's our little way of giving back to the country is through the veterans wreaths program and the new veterans remembers trees program. >> that's captain brent morale, u.s. marine corps. this is another tree has been
in europe, greece was the problem child that spent too much, saved nothing and threatened to take down the euro. new leadership, pay cuts, higher taxes as their weary government begs for more cash. committing to save the euro. it lives on, but for how long? >> the deadliest month to date as the assad regime intensified its air power. >> how much longer can this man hold on to power? bashar al assad was under even more intense pressure to step down but his regime stepped up the fire power against the opposition, civilians caught in the crossfire, more than 40,000 people have died so far. >> reporter: this is yet another bread line. >> the opposition fights on, making more dramatic gains than ever and gaining pledges of support from the international community. number one, she fought back from the brink of death after being attacked on a school bus. the taliban shot malala yousafzai. she survived, wake up in a british hospital and, according to her father, immediately asked for her school books. the world was gripped, moved and inspired by the story of one determined young girl facing do
there are two that we're watching for american investors. one is greece, one is italy. the developments today are both good from an american investing perspective because they keep a lid on what's happening in those two respects. in greece there was trouble on the streets of athens last night as a result of left-wing protesters and students out and police using tear gas to disperse them as they protested the death of a teenager as a result of a police shooting four years ago, but the more important thing from a market perspective is that in 30 minutes' time now, the book will close on the greek debt buyback. now, remember what's happening here. the greek government is borrowing 10 billion euros from the rest of europe to buy back its own debt at a discount. if it does that successfully, by midday our time when that book closes, then more cash will flow through from the rest of europe, possibly next week it will be able to repay its bills and capitalize on the banks. let's check the close. >> the european markets are closing now. >> so we kind of went nowhere today. a lot of these markets in e
than greece, more than spain. but conversely, china, if gdp is coming back, they are in what many consider to be a sweet spot. >> the numbers came out saturday for china. i think italy has been remarkably good. so this was a big game changer. italy had been a part of the good story of european recovery. now it's back. >> all to monti was never intended to be there for the long term. >> sure. >> in fact, he may be leaving a month earlier than originally planned. this should not be a surprise in the larger context. while we may mention berlusconi's name right now, he's not expected to win. >> look, we knew that monti was successful. >> it may be whoever follows him is going to roll some of the gains that he's had. so-called gains. >> that's going to cause ripples here. look, on saturday night, i said, we're going to have a nice opening. china's good, people know that monti is not really going to hurt italy. i think if china continues the momentum, but the number -- >> the ex sports were less than expected in the month of november. which is a concern. then there's this perverse glass
with greece. the buyback has gone through. they've raised over 31 million euros -- billion euros at face value. it would appear they had to pay more to get the debt off the u.s. hedge funds and the greek banks and everybody else. therefore they're short by about 450 million euros on their targets. eurozone conference call is about to start with the finance ministers to sort out exactly what they do. in general terms around europe today there is optimism. you'll see that in this close. europe shutting down. >> the european markets are closing now. >> remember yesterday and all that concern we had about where italy might go with the resignation of mario monti. greece is higher. por sh gal is higher. spain is higher. it's a good day for -- investor sentiment.strongly it was revealed today. optimism over what the fed is going to do in the united states tomorrow. optimism there will be a deal on the fiscal cliff. you have optimism that the recapitalization of the banks is going to be delayed by another year according to the bank of italy. and you have optimism as well on mar of election promises as
. this morning, they agreed finally on the disbursement of aid to greece. some says it removed uncertainty. other investors, not so sure. i wanted to show you the italian curve, italy and spanl wrapping up their fund-raising for the year. their auctions weren't all of that huge, but we are seeing yields fall, prices rise across the board as investors did show up. if we flip over to spain in particular, we can take a look at the three-year over here. a bid to cover ratio of 4.8%. one indication certainly of the kind of indications there are where the ecb is expected to be the most active if and when these countries have to access their bailout programs. now we're seeing prices in spain sell off a little bit. the ten-year, just under 5.4% is the level there. for the longer dated papers, investors are a little bit more wary. now, that news coming out of the euro group meeting, i wanted to show you the euro/dollar as we wrap up today's global market support. it's still down .1%, 1.3056. that would tell you that the resolution is largely priced in. now as focus moves into the start of next year, a cou
of greece. we saw these up in the range of better than 8% earlier. now in the range of 5% to 8%. again, if you look at the levels, you see we're snapping up from low valuations generally speaking. it doesn't take a lot at 63 cents to get an 8% move. >>> quick look over here if you want to take a shot of the wall behind me. it is green for the most part. and greece's borse is one adding 2% today. we're seeing that reflected across the bond space. portugal for example seeing ten-year yields falling. same for spain and italy. the boreses and footy 100, the xetra dax, this has been the outperformer up in the range of 30%. another .3% after the ifo out of germany. came in better than expected. again, a good sign for growth. not necessarily, though, for those who would like to see a weaker europe. the ibex 35 adding 1.3%. and the nikkei, as you mentioned, up above 10,000 for the first time in eight months. adding 2.4%. better hope the moves in the japanese government or bank of japan pan out. we'll get the bank of japan's decision tomorrow. but this comes on the day when, remember, it's on t
legislator of athens in ancient greece. and he replaced the prevailing system at the time of oral, law and blood feud by a written code of rules that could only be enforced by a court. the first court system. so the rules, because they were written, were hard to get around so they were draconian rules, which is where draconian -- draco. >> wasn't he in harry potter, too? >> he was also in harry potter. i don't know.was he? >> i think he was the bad kid growing up. >> and, anyway, with that out of the way and the world hurdling to an end tomorrow, still to come, if you want to know whether or not you should be optimistic about a fiscal cliff deal -- >> oh, draco malfoy. >> oh, yeah, the young bad kid? >> the blond kid. >> he was so good he was bad. check out the markets on any given day and we're going to do just that. tell what's happening with the fiscal cliff. [ penélope ] i found the best cafe in the world. nespresso. where i never have to compromise on anything. ♪ where just one touch creates the perfect coffee. where every cappuccino and latte is only made with fresh milk. and
to our problems so we don't end up in the situation europe is, or greece with riots, or france with a top 75% tax rate that's driving people offshore. >> the problem may be that paul ryan coming through with solid plans on the deficit issue, and ultimately didn't win the white house. is it possible to have the conversation with america get voted in, and then take action? >> personally, i think the ryan plan was an abomination, because it was so vague, that you can't tell whether it was a real plan or not. >> it was not vague. it was written down in the house budget. >> it is absolutely unspecified across all kinds of loophole closings and other things, which makes it filed under category of fiction for anybody that's ever worked in the united states senate. >> specifically it's written specifically in the path to prosperity. it was passed by the house. you can look at path to prosperity in google. you see many of the details. at least the house passed a budget, which the senate has not done for the past three years. the house has laid out solutions. also, laid out changes to the sequester
we get to 2020, we're going to be in the shape greece is in with 152% of our gdp being locked into debt. we cannot sustain this. you have to begin to make some systematic across the board and detailed reductions in this spending discretionary and on the entitlement and you have to deal with the trust funds and treat them as trust funds, not as pass-throughs to the general fund. >> congresswoman, thank you very much. i know it's a busy day. >> it is. thank you. >> congresswoman blackburn. >>> steve liesman is working on this since late last night. at the very least, steve, it's high theater, wouldn't you agree? >> high theater and complex math, carl. what we want to do is concentrate on what i market really cares about. how far apart are the sides? unfortunately, it is so complicated we can only do one piece at a time. so we're only in this presentation going to talk about revenue, not spending. and i have to say, these are the best available numbers? are they the actual numbers? we have only run them by each side and they have said that they are not far off or as close as you
harry, during one of the breaks, talking about greece. you had an unconventional view, i think, of what's going on there. >> still tons of issues, major risks but i think finally some signs after five years of decline, it is starting to bottom. first, the eu demonstrated they will do anything to keep power, partly because he has made some progress and partly because the alternatives are scarry. finally seeing improvements in the budget deficit numbers. >> you are buying stuff? >> looking at stuff. finally start to see investors move in 2013. already seen government bonds in 2012 and i think you will see asset sales. >> you agree? you remember your name before -- >> that does it for us today. make sure you join us tomorrow. right now, time for "squawk on the street." >>> good morning, welcome to squawk on the street. i'm carl quintanilla, melissaly, jim cramer. nyse euro net selling itself to ice for 8.2 billion in cash and stock. david is here to break it down. >> go through some of the numbers four. the deal itself having been officially announced in the last half hour or so b
greece they are not a monolithing society. for some people that would be totally impossible to utter a word or a sound. for other people it's cathartic to open up and express their love and devotion and to have the final words over someone they love. i try very much as a pastor not to among their relationships and emotions and how they use to commemorate the person they leaply will have. >> as a reporter i like to get as many information as you can. i want to know every detail about everything and that's a way of processing it, managing it. people must ask you questions you cannot answer. and they say where was god when this happened? >> it's precisely as you is asaid i've tried to avoid answers goesable temporary. there are some things that are handeds now life that we do not know or understand. these areas, ambiguous areas where we don't have a deficit answer it's better not to give any answer at all than to give one inappropriate. that's why we have faith for those things we cannot explain and point to directly, we have to frtrust god and lean on him get through the sufficient tim
a year. greece has a debt problem. we have a significant debt problem. martha: indeed. stuart, thank you. >> sure. bill: $16 trillion. now to newtown, connecticut, attempted normalcy and so much heartache. schools in the area opening first time since friday's massacre except of course sandy hook elementary which remains closed indefinitely as police continue their investigation there. there are questions whether it will be ever reopen. volunteers in the neighboring town of monroe, seven miles away, hard at work, getting a former middle school ready for sandy hook students. all of this as the grim task of bearing so many young innocents gets underway. 10:00 in the morning funeral services begin for james mattioli. followed by services for jessica reek coast. -- rekos. a rabbi spoke about that service. >> being celebrated as a pure innocent child by the promise of life ahead of him. who brought joy to his family and to his community and who will be sorely missed. as his older brother said he could have been anything if he had grown up. this is tragedy that we have no answers for this. bill
this yesterday that greece has priced the debt buyback where it has. it will be more generous and next week they're likely to get their money from the rest of the european union. taking some of those concerns back out of the market so, again, today the spanish bond market rallying and, therefore, the yield forming. still above 5% but falling. it's also true of italy. there the yields are down. take a look at where we are on the ten year, 4.4% and those bonds rise in value, you see the italian banks, for example, rising in value. the stock market, it's obvious the value of their assets is gaining ground. other financials around europe, the likes of kbc, bank of ireland, a lot of questions to the degree the irish can get better terms for their bailout or deal as a result of what the greeks have been given. there is -- and carl mentioned this, one area of concern today, and that's the finance minister's meeting where the frie french and the germans seem at odds over how they're going to get banking union, the germans are saying it cannot -- the individual banks cannot all be controlled by the ecb,
is considered crucial for greece's efforts to resolve the financial problem. >>> and the european union has fined tv and computer monitor makers about $2 billion saying those companies fixed monitor tube prices for a decade which ended in 2006 talking about companies like philips, lg, and panasonic among the companies fined. philips, which was assessed the biggest chunk of the penalty says it will appeal the ruling. >>> and mortgage applications rose 4.5% last week according to new figures from the mortgage bankers association. most of the increase was accounted for by a rise in refinancing activity. >>> all right. the dollar hitting a six-week low on uncertainty about whether a budget deal would be reached. meantime, oil continues to trade below $90 a barrel. joining us this morning, chief market strategist at worldwide markets. also kevin book who is managing director at clear view energy partners. and joe, let's start off talking about the dollar. i can't make heads or tails of why the dollar is under so much pressure. i know things are bad here, we're worried about the fiscal cliff. but
, a finance ministers' meeting is beginning, which they will say, look, greece, we will make up the half billion that you're short on the bond buy-back. a deal is a deal. and this month, 34 billion euros will flow from bailout funds into the greek banks to recapitalize them. more importantly perhaps, tomorrow we go into a full meeting of all 27 heads of state of the european union. germany is back down. looks like we have a deal on banking union. the ecb will supervise all banks presumably in the euro zone. that means the ecb will be able to directly tap into those bailout funds and recapitalize the banks, plugging in across the euro zone. this is hugely important in building those firewalls against contagion. the result of the stock market is that you continue to get gains. the top 50 blue chips in europe is the white line. the dow jones industrial average is the yellow. this is a chart since the results of the election. as we are mired in the fiscal cliff here, they've been able to make almost 4% gains on their top blue chips. meanwhile, also worth mentioning that, after the sell-off w
% the last month. the eu finance ministers' plan to give money to greece, will the rally continue? todd gordon is with us aspen trading you. morning to you, todd. >> hey, simon. >> we have failed twice to get through 1.31 on the euro. where do we go from here? >> the fourth time we tried? the euro support and european finance ministers rather busy, appoint the ecb to head up a eu banking regulation which unfortunately you won't take effect until march 2014. the meantime we need to rely on esm for support. the other side, german finance minister wrote off the lower bank, congress that they approve a greek aid bailout. looks to be euro fairly support. >> interesting you argue that. in is the point here that the fed is accelerating on debasing you the dollars, that is why the euro rises? >> really interesting. that was the trade yesterday. the take away from the fed's statement. we reached a new high in qe 4, 85 billion a month, purchased and treasuries and mds that put the dollar to heel. overnight, reaction to the fed, overnight you can the dollar stayed very offered and i think despite
a year. the equivalent of about $55,000. the current top tax rate in greece is 45% for those earning more than 100,000 euros. finally, business sentiment in europe is slumping in part due to economic uncertainty ahead of this weekend's election. the bank of japan sentiment index dropping to minus 12 from minus 3 in the prior quarter. that was a bigger drop than economists were expecting. mr. kernen? >> all right. getting all these things. so you like he's like bloomberg? no 16 ounce -- >> guy runs -- >> you know. >> no 16 ounce anything over that in sugared drinks. comments, questions about anything you see here on "squawk," e-mail us at squawk @c in.com. you can also follow us on twitter @squawkcnbc. still to come this morning, john mcafee. in the flesh. well he won't be here but on camera. in his first interview since arriving back in the states. an interview you've got to see. plus. have you seen these? want to know how to use them? one of the new ways retailers are hoping to win over consumers. we're going to explain qr codes. the bar code guy died yesterday. can i help you? i heard y
side not the call side. they basically said to me, hmm we're not concerned about greece. we're not concerned about the economy. why don't you have these put calls they're really almost for free. we bought puts so we didn't have a loss in that drawdown. then we listen again. and we didn't have to -- again, we don't have to be that smart. okay. we're not that smart. again, we get into the next time, and draghi is talking about this, that the other, talking about this put and boy he did. he gave away this put. people not listening to it. you know what we did when we heard about that? we got invested. and that worked too. then we got into this election and said boy doesn't look like the market is going to be happy about this election, because obama is going to win. whether or not that was right or wrong, and they're going toish concerned about the fiscal cliff. we took down our position again. now when the market went down again, we said, okay, what are we going to do now? hmm, they're giving away call puts. call premium now. call premium traded really cheap. what should we do?
leverage to turn the country around, prevent it from becoming greece and save social security and medicare. >> as a practical matter no matter what congress and the white house do before the end of the year it is already too late for most employers to accurately withhold taxes from the january pay checks unless there is no change so workers will feel immediately for example that 2% hike in social security taxes in those first january pay checks. carl? >> i hate to work in an accounts payable department over the next couple weeks, hampton. it is going to be kind of nutty. thanks so much. hampton pearson in washington. procrastinators across the country are hitting the malls today to take advantage of the last-minute sales. find out which retailers are going to benefit the most. but first, rick santelli is working on something for a little later on. rick? >> and probably about a dozen minutes of course we'll come back and have a guest and who would be the perfect guest on a christmas eve where there is so much going on in the world of finance, politics, of course you must have guessed it. ir
approaches greece-like levels. and they went so far as to bond out their debt service. issuing bonds to pay their interest and that is just a true muni bond person. that is like a knife in the heart, pain. >> don't go anywhere. stick around for the rest of the hour. thank you for being here on this holiday. >> glad to be here. >> what are you looking at? >> nothing. >> the red. >> it's like orange on camera. >> it is a little orange. >> is this a holiday? you keep saying that. >> we've been doing all sorts of holiday things. really? >> so it is the holidays? >> yes, it is. >> i've got to get with it. anyway, coming up, how much you pay for something online could depend on where your computer is located. first, though -- >> i know. attention, boys and girls and santa fans everywhere. in a holiday tradition in north american air space defense demand or norad is ready to help you track the jolly old elf and his reindeer. the funniest line in vacation, the movie, christmas where they're at the dinner table and clark says that santa has been spotted coming across the border up north. and his cou
prediction for 2012 correct. >> rubbing it in. >> greece will stain the euro in 2013. that's what lang merkel wants and she's holding the purse strings. she wants to be re-elected and doesn't want any cost of contagion in. the cost on a relative basis is cheap. mexico is the next hot market. almost unnoticed, our southern neighbor becoming an economic stronghold on its own. legal and financial reforms have led to a growing middle class. as china gets more expensive, mexico becomes more competitive in manufacturing. africa disappoints classic emerging markets of russia, brazil and china slow down from their heyday and so-called frontier funds have been started with a focus on the next hot growth area, focusing on africa and many believe now is the time. this is an overgeneralization. the rule of law is not widespread enough in the continent. there is a glimmer of hope such as sun nish sha. countries such as egypt still questionable. we have seen mass rioting there and growing concerns whether the new rule of law and new constitution will effectively protect investors. >> just a few years ago,
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